Adult Spotted Lanternfly. Photo by Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture

SLF with closed wings. Photo by Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture

S/lF
Image by Stephen Ausmus, USDA-ARS

SLF late stage nymph on the left and SLF early stage nymph on the right Photo by Stephen Ausmus, USDA-ARS

SLF egg masses on a tree. Photo by Kenneth R. Law, USDA APHIS PPQ, bugwood.org.

Spotted Lanternfly

Spotted Lanternfly (SLF) is an invasive plant hopper from China and Southeastern Asia that was first found in Pennsylvania in 2014. In 2017, a dead adult SLF was found in Delaware County in New York State. As of Nov. 17, 2021, SLF infestations are present in Long Island. SLFs feed on over 70 plant species including Tree of Heaven, grapevines, hops, apple, blueberry and stone fruits. Because of their choice of host plants, this species proves a great threat to the vineyard, orchard and forest industries.

SLF adults are identified by their red hind wings with black spots and yellow abdomen with a black banding pattern. The nymphs of SLF are either black with white spots or red and black with white spots that are less than an inch in size.

They feed on these plants by using their mouth parts to pierce and suck the sap from the plant which weakens the plant and causes it excrete honeydew during infestation which can cause sooty mold growth.

To control the spread of SLF, the Department of Agriculture and Markets (AGM) issued a quarantine to restrict the movement of goods such as packing materials, landscaping equipment and nursery stock by requiring certificates of inspection for materials from other impacted states like DE, NJ, PA, MD and VA. The Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC) has established Protective Zones in 20 counties in New York which allows the DEC and community partners to survey, monitor, and manage infested areas to prevent SLF spread.

To manage SLF populations, traps such as sticky band traps and circle traps and some specific pesticide products may be used. In the late fall, SLF egg masses—which are present on trees, rocks, lawn furniture and virtually any flat surface outdoors— may be scraped into a resealable bag that contains rubbing alcohol or hand sanitizer and dispose of them properly.

If you encounter a spotted lanternfly, take a photo and send the picture and information about the location where it was found to spottedlanternfly@agriculture.ny.gov.

Resources

The following websites and publications provide regularly updated information on the SLF, its identification, spread and management practices.

Spotted Lanternfly (Lycorma delicatula) Long Island Invasive Species Management Area. This webpage highlights the introduction of Spotted Lanternfly to the L.I. region as well as a description of the damage and concern the species can cause and in-depth information on management and control methods.

Spotted Lanternfly, New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC).This webpage provides individuals with information about SLF including identification, risk to New York State, signs or infestation, current control efforts and access to SLF-related resources.

Spotted Lanternfly Overview, New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. This website provides resources on how individuals can take action towards SLF, the status of quarantined areas, the species potential agricultural impact as well as a brief overview of New York State’s efforts.

Spotted Lanternfly Distribution, New York State Integrated Pest Management. This webpage provides a confirmed Spotted Lanternfly reported distribution map with regional and county specifications to track the infestation and spread of SLF.

Spotted Lanternfly Invasive Species Information, New York Invasive Species (IS) Information. This webpage provides access to information about the biology, impacts, detection and management of the Spotted Lanternfly and other invasive species in New York State.

Photos:

Photo Main: Adult Spotted Lanternfly. Photo by Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Dept. of Agriculture, bugwood.org

Photo 1: SLF with closed wings. Photo by Lawrence Barringer, Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture, bugwood.org.

Photo 2: SLF late stage nymph on the left and SLF early stage nymph on the right Photo by Stephen Ausmus, USDA-ARS

Photo 3: SLF egg masses on a tree. Photo by Kenneth R. Law, USDA APHIS PPQ, bugwood.org.

Contact

Christina McLaughlin
Natural Resources Educator
cmm482@cornell.edu
516-565-5265 Ext. 15

Last updated January 7, 2022